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Unsettled - Media

Claire Vince - Media Advisor. claire.vince@australian.museum. 0468 726 910 Farley Fitzgerald - Communications Advisor. farley.fitzgerald@australian.museum. 0455 306 788
  • Unsettled media release
    Claire Vince
    Sydney, 21 May 2021: The Australian Museum (AM) will present one of the most significant exhibitions in its history: Unsettled, opening FREE to the public on Saturday 22 May in the AM’s new touring exhibition hall. In this powerful exhibition, First Nations’ voices tell Australia's foundation story including First Nations resilience and survival. First-hand accounts are presented through historical documents, large-scale artworks, immersive experiences and never-before-seen objects from the Australian Museum collection.
    Australian Museum
  • Unsettled media release
    Claire Vince
    Sydney, 21 May 2021: The Australian Museum (AM) will present one of the most significant exhibitions in its history: Unsettled, opening FREE to the public on Saturday 22 May in the AM’s new touring exhibition hall. In this powerful exhibition, First Nations’ voices tell Australia's foundation story including First Nations resilience and survival. First-hand accounts are presented through historical documents, large-scale artworks, immersive experiences and never-before-seen objects from the Australian Museum collection.
    Australian Museum
  • VIDEO: Unsettled exhibition opeing Vox Pops
    Butter Media
    VIDEO
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Vox Pops
    event
    opening
    exhibition
    Unsettled, a groundbreaking First Nations exhibition, opened free to the public at the Australian Museum on Saturday 22 May. In this video, learn about the significance of this exhibition from Australian Museum Director & CEO Kim McKay AO and First Nations leaders Distinguished Professor Larissa Behrendt AO, Luke Pearson, Professor John Maynard, Aunty Fay Moseley and Dr Shayne Williams. Produced by Butter Media for the Australian Museum 1080p H264
    Australian Museum
  • Red, White and Blue - Danie Mellor
    Stuart Humphreys
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Art
    Sculpture
    mosaic
    Red, White and Blue 2008 Danie Mellor, Mamu, Ngagen, Ngajan Mixed media. Australian Museum Collection In the colours of the British flag, three kangaroos are posed as figures who knew all, but professed no knowledge as to the impact of empire building, past or present: they see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. In another sense, these kangaroos stand also for the muted position of a culture that was dominated and undermined by the loss of language, displacement, and ultimately the deliberate attempt to curtail a way of life and exploit the natural resources – cultural, spiritual, social, and material – of the land.
    Australian Museum
  • Vincent Lingiari am (1919-1988) Blood Money – Ten Dollar Note – Vincent Lingiari Commemorative 2011
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Vincent Lingiari am (1919-1988) Blood Money – Ten Dollar Note – Vincent Lingiari Commemorative 2011 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Vincent Lingiari was a Gurindji lore (law) man and talented stockman. He worked on the Wave Hill Cattle Station in the Northern Territory which had been established on his Ancestral Country. The Gurindji workers were poorly treated by the managers of the station. Vincent himself received no cash payment for his work, notwithstanding his position as head stockman. In 1966, Vincent led a walk off with two hundred Aboriginal workers at the Wave Hill station. This marked the beginning of a seven-year strike in protest of the poor working conditions and the dispossession suffered by the Gurindji.
    Ryan Presley
  • Truganini (c 1812-1876) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Truganini Commemorative 2011
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Truganini (c 1812-1876) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Truganini Commemorative 2011 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Truganini was a strong and intelligent Nunnone woman. When hardly more than a child, she lived through The Black War of Tasmania. She survived by building strategic alliances with different people, both Aboriginal and European. Over seven decades she experienced a psychological and cultural shift more than most human imaginations could endure. Notwithstanding efforts by missionaries, she never gave up her cultural beliefs. Whenever away from authorities, she would hunt, dive, participate in ceremony and return to her traditional Country, Lunawanna Alonnah (Bruny Island).
    Ryan Presley
  • Fanny Balbuk (1840-1907) Blood Money – Fifty Dollar Note – Fanny Balbuk Commemorative 2011
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Fanny Balbuk (1840-1907) Blood Money – Fifty Dollar Note – Fanny Balbuk Commemorative 2011 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Fanny Balbuk was a Noongar Elder who defied the incursion of settlements and urban expansion on her traditional lands. She witnessed the devastation of Country by colonisers in Perth. In the 1890s, the railway station and other buildings were erected on important hunting grounds that had sustained her people from time immemorial. Fanny was renowned for protesting such occupation of her traditional lands. One of her most frequent protests was to stand at the entrance to Government House, reviling all who lived behind those stone gates that enclosed her grandmother’s burial ground.
    Ryan Presley
  • Pemulwuy (c 1750-1802) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Bembulwoyan Commemorative 2018
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Pemulwuy (c 1750-1802) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Bembulwoyan Commemorative 2018 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Pemulwuy was a Bidjigal lore (law) man and formidable warrior. He is one of the most well-known resistance fighters of the early colony. He adamantly opposed the violence against Aboriginal peoples and the destruction and disrespect of his Ancestral lands. A respected leader, he united clans in a successful resistance campaign. In defence of their land and livelihoods, they would spear cattle, burn huts and homes, destroy crops and attack settlers. Pemulwuy evaded capture many times but was killed in 1802. Pemulwuy’s campaign lasted 12 years; he fought hard, inspired many, and died for his people.
    Ryan Presley
  • Gladys Tybingoompa (1946-2006) Blood Money – One Hundred Dollar Note – Gladys Tybingoompa Commemorative 2011
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Gladys Tybingoompa (1946-2006) Blood Money – One Hundred Dollar Note – Gladys Tybingoompa Commemorative 2011 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Gladys Tybingoompa was a Wik woman and formidable warrior. She was one of the five plaintiffs in the Wik vs Queensland Native Title case put to the High Court of Australia. In 1978, the Wik Elders began a fight for ownership of their traditional lands, as recognised by common law. Gladys said, “I’ll follow the line no matter how long, no matter how hard it gets … we need our land”. And they did fight long and hard, with a judgment being handed down in their favour in 1996. This judgment was significant as it found Native Title could co-exist with other interests including Pastoral Leases.
    Ryan Presley
  • Dundalli (1820-1855) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Dundalli Commemorative 2017
    Ryan Presley
    Unsettled
    Blood Money
    Ryan Presley
    Dundalli (1820-1855) Blood Money – Infinite Dollar Note – Dundalli Commemorative 2017 Dr Ryan Presley, Marri Ngarr Reproduction of the artwork. Australian Museum Collection Digital Acquisition Dundalli was a Dalla warrior from the Blackall Ranges. At the instruction of Elders, Dundalli led early diplomatic attempts to negotiate with European settlers to trade for materials and food. But several unjust events including a massacre (by poisoning food), caused relations to deteriorate. Dundalli and other warriors undertook a resistance campaign, destroying crops, ransacking houses and injuring colonisers, successfully ejecting Europeans from Aboriginal lands. His commitment to exacting Aboriginal justice made him a hero to local clans and a feared enemy to European settlers.
    Ryan Presley
  • Brungle Wooden Chain, Spinner and Hook c 1900
    Abram Powell
    First Nations
    Unsettled
    Catalogue
    Brungle Wooden Chain, Spinner and Hook c 1900 Made by Ancestor, Brungle Mission, NSW Willow wood. Australian Museum Collection This wooden chain, hand-carved with a pen knife entirely from a single solid piece of wood, was collected by the Brungle mission manager John Hubbard. Less is known about the Aboriginal maker, who was recorded simply as “a full-blooded Aboriginal”. Chains of this style, typically made of heavy metal, would have been a familiar sight to the maker; neck chains and other restraints were a common form of punishment and control for Aboriginal people. They were often chained when made to work on roads, railway lines and when clearing land for colonisers. Chains were not phased out until the 1940s but were still recorded in use until the 1960s. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • Cook Falling, Tear it Down, Graphic Novel Study
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    catalog
    Cook Falling, Tear it Down, Graphic Novel Study 2019 Travis De Vries, Gamilaroi Digital print on archival paper. Australian Museum Collection Acquisition Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • Weaving Woman drawing
    Abram Powell
    illustration
    First Nations
    Drawing
    Ink
    Unsettled
    Weaving Woman 2019 Genevieve Stewart, Kuku Yalanji Ink on paper. Australian Museum Collection Acquisition. Culture is integral to First Nations identity, influencing sense of self, belonging, and wellbeing. It is a source of pride, promoting agency and self-determination. Research illustrates that having the capacity to engage with and practice culture has positive social and economic outcomes for First Nations peoples.42 Weaving Woman was inspired by the artist’s experience of the Kanalaritja: An Unbroken String exhibition and by participating in weaving workshops with Elders. Weaving Woman is Genevieve’s response to “feeling incomplete regarding my cultural identity, and how reconnecting with cultural practices under the guidance and support of community can help fill a void in one’s relationship with culture”.
    Australian Museum
  • Billy Griffith, King of Waradgery Breastplate 1866
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    exhibition
    Billy Griffith, King of Waradgery Breastplate 1866 Maker Unknown Brass. Australian Museum Collection Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • Prince Henry, Duchess Breastplate, date unknown
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    exhibition
    Prince Henry, Duchess Breastplate, date unknown Maker Unknown Brass. Australian Museum Collection
    Australian Museum
  • Kitten, Chief of Sydney Tribe Breastplate, date unknown
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    exhibition
    Kitten, Chief of Sydney Tribe Breastplate, date unknown Maker Unknown Brass. Australian Museum Collection There is very little information in living memory about Kitten. What is known is that he was one of the first people to be given a brass gorget, king plate or breastplate. In December 1816, Governor Macquarie began the practice of awarding breastplates to those who agreed to “sue for peace” and adopt the “plan of life” Macquarie had devised for them. The awards were made at the “Native Feasts” he hosted at Parramatta once a year, to which different clan groups would travel and where they would accept gifts of clothes and blankets. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • Unsettled catalogue image
    Abram Powell
    First Nations
    Unsettled
    Art
    Brothers (The Prodigal Son II) 2020 Tony Albert, Girramay, Kuku Yalanji Glass, lead, photographic decal, steel, stone. Australian Museum Collection Acquisition At a protest in 2012 held in response to an incident of police brutality against a group of young Aboriginal men in Sydney’s Kings Cross, artist Tony Albert saw several male Aboriginal teenagers remove their shirts to reveal red targets painted on their chests. This decorative embodiment of racialised targeting and the over-policing of Aboriginal people, inspired Albert to create the Brothers photographic series, and now glasswork series, The Prodigal Son, which takes the imagery of these targeted men and transforms them into commanding representations usually reserved for those in positions of privilege. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • nawi (Tied-bark Canoe) Miniature
    Abram Powell
    First Nations
    Unsettled
    nawi
    nawi (Tied-bark Canoe) Miniature 2020 Uncle Steven Russell, Bidjigal dthah dthaang (stringybark). Australian Museum Collection Acquisition The nawi (tied-bark canoe) was utilised by Pemulwuy as an important tool in the campaign against the invaders. Nawira (canoes) were extremely versatile – swift, silent, light and easily landed anywhere, suited to lightning raids and hasty retreats. From 1788 to 1810, there were numerous raids conducted in canoes against homesteads, government buildings, as well as British vessels. For many years, the guerrilla warfare campaign by the Sydney clans hemmed the colonists inside their encampments. Colonists were unable to go outside the “lines of limitation” without firearms or an escort of soldiers. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum
  • Manly mogo (Stone Axe) 1836
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Manly mogo (Stone Axe) 1836 Made by Ancestor Metamorphic stone, wood, plant fibre. Manly Cove in Sydney, New South Wales was named by Captain Arthur Phillip as a tribute to the “confidence and manly behaviour” of the Aboriginal men he saw there. They were healthy and strong from living in open, clean environments. Contrary to Phillip’s direct experience, Aboriginal people were often portrayed in colonial writing as inferior, helpless, and in need of salvation.These stereotypes were used strategically to dehumanise Aboriginal people and justify the taking of their land. This mogo, gifted by an Aboriginal man to a young girl in Manly, is one of only two complete pre-European hafted axes from the Sydney region to have survived. Image taken March 2021 for the Unsettled exhibition catalogue.
    Australian Museum
  • The Help. Artwork by Karla Dickens
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    catalogue
    catalog
    The Help 2015 by Karla Dickens, Wiradjuri Australian Museum Collection Acquisition. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition catalogue March 2021
    Karla Dickens
  • The Help. Artwork by Karla Dickens
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    catalogue
    catalog
    The Help 2015 by Karla Dickens, Wiradjuri Australian Museum Collection Acquisition. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition catalogue March 2021
    Karla Dickens
  • One Way Ticket to Hell 2012-2020
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Painting
    Art
    One Way Ticket to Hell 2012-2020 Aunty Fay Moseley, Wiradjuri Acrylic on canvas. Australian Museum Collection Acquisition Aboriginal children, like Aunty Fay and five of her siblings, were kidnapped and placed in institutional care or domestic training homes operated by the Aborigines Welfare/Protection Board. Siblings were often separated. Aunty Fay and her sisters were taken to Cootamundra Domestic Training Home, and her brothers were sent to Kinchela Boys Home. In these institutions, people recall being told to act white, be white and think white. Aunty Fay was an A Grade student before she was taken – but at the homes, the children’s education became D grade, “D for domestic servants”. It took eight years for Aunty Fay to paint this image of the day she was taken from her mother. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition 2021
    Artist, Aunty Fay Clayton Moseley
  • Hooking the Natives
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Art
    Hooking the Natives 2020 Karla Dickens, Wiradjuri Mixed media. Christian missionaries and organisations played significant roles in the Stolen Generations through their running of institutions and homes. Assimilation of children involved the severing of contact to families and communities, and the active destruction of cultural knowledges and identities to be replaced with a new Christian identity and way of life. These objects bring attention to how Christianity and the Bible were used as tools for restraining culture and how religion was co-opted into the colonial project by colonisers to justify their actions as a means to a greater good. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum, by Karla Dickens 2020
  • Chained Culture
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Art
    Chained Culture 2020 Karla Dickens, Wiradjuri Mixed media. Christian missionaries and organisations played significant roles in the Stolen Generations through their running of institutions and homes. Assimilation of children involved the severing of contact to families and communities, and the active destruction of cultural knowledges and identities to be replaced with a new Christian identity and way of life. These objects bring attention to how Christianity and the Bible were used as tools for restraining culture and how religion was co-opted into the colonial project by colonisers to justify their actions as a means to a greater good. Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum, by Karla Dickens 2020
  • Death Spear
    Abram Powell
    Unsettled
    First Nations
    Death Spear 2021 Raymond Timbery, Bidjigal Dharrawal, and Joel Deaves, Gumea Dharrawal Silcrete, resin, plant fibre, sinew, shell, mingo (grass tree). Australian Museum Collection Commission Photographed for the Unsettled exhibition March 2021
    Australian Museum, by Raymond Timbery